The Stanford Laptop Orchestra performing Twilight (2013)

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  • #Previous Work #inspiration
  • 5 days ago

From Smule.com

Created by Mayo57 after the devastating earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on March 11, 2011, Lean on Meinspired over 3,000 people to join together in a song of solidarity, empathy, and hope. Today, we pay tribute to the victims of this terrible tragedy and continue to be inspired by the resilience of the human spirit.

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  • #karaoke
  • 5 days ago

Did an odd assortment of things today. It started off by

  • doing a search for existing karaoke apps on iOS and Android
  • stumbled on a NYT article with a nice summary of mobile-based music apps
  • learning about Smule, which manufactures the successful karaoke app Sing
  • Learned about the founder of Smule, Ge Wang, who also happens to be an assistant professor at Stanford CCRMA
  • saw his talk about the Stanford Laptop Orchestra
  • started watching a video on Chuck, the programming language he created. 

I also:

Hm. I’m realizing something that’s kind of obvious to me now. I’m interested in Internet-based communities. And the kind of creativity that happens on the Internet. Damn. It seems so obvious to me now. 

So if I were to revise my research question…. hm… 

Well, for starters, I think my entire research has a kind of design research approach. It starts with an ethnography in order to ground context. Then I will run some design thinking workshops for prototyping. I will have to see whether the participants can be from these communities. Then do design. 

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  • #journal
  • 6 days ago

Love the use of everyday objects by artist Shih Chieh Huang, who as it turns out I shared an exhibition space with in Biomodd NYC in 2012 at the New York Hall of Science!

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  • #inspiration
  • 1 week ago
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  • #inspiration
  • 1 week ago
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  • #inspiration
  • 1 week ago

I had no idea the theremin could be played like this. The bass imitation was fantastic. Her explanation of how her body is central to the instrument is also fascinating:

(11:57) sometimes if I have too much coffee, then my vibrato gets out of hand. You’re really sensitive to your body and its functions when you’re behind this thing. You have to stay so still if you want to have the most control. It reminds me of the balancing act earlier on — what Michael was doing — because you’re fighting so hard to keep the balance with what you’re playing with and stay in tune, and at the same time you don’t want to focus so much on being in tune all the time; you want to be feeling the music.

(12:29) And then also, you’re trying to stay very, very, very still because little movements with other parts of your body will affect the pitch, or sometimes if you’re holding a low note — (Tone rising out of key) — and breathing will make it …

(12:53) I think of it almost like like a yoga instrument because it makes you so aware of every little crazy thing your body is doing, or just aware of what you don’t want it to be doing while you’re playing; you don’t want to have any sudden movements. And if I go to a club and play a gig, people are like, "Here, have some drinks on us!" And it’s like, “Well, I’m about to go on soon; I don’t want to be like — (Teetering tones) — you know?”

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  • #inspiration
  • 1 week ago

Pure Data resources from Michael Straeubig

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  • #tools
  • 1 week ago

Post pre-RDC1 presentation notes

Yesterday, I was asked what I wanted to really know at the end of the research. It’s one of those tricky questions that I, as someone trained in artistic practice, find difficult to answer, especially given the kind of decisions I had made about where I should take my research, and especially since there are so many things that I want to do and know. (And that’s something else, too: what relationship between knowing and doing—between apprehending the world and transforming it—would satisfy me?) I gave a kind of glib and honestly kind of useless answer, but at the time it seemed appropriate. 

For instance, I was wondering how different postures and gestures might change the way we write code or think about text. If we computed lying down, for example, or we had to exert a lot of energy to enter text by using big sweeping gestures to enter text, would we code and write very different things? Would we be more careful about the kinds of things that we create?  

Anyway, the presentation went well

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  • #journal
  • 1 week ago

Random thoughts

Other musical projects I want to wok on: - The music of plants: translating very slow or very processes into something perceptible. - making visible complex systems (sculpture of a neural network) - Immersive sound environment for social networks - interactive system for gestural language based on illusion styles

Another possible research question: Sound is movement made audible. What are the different ways in which the relationship between movement and sound has been facilitated through interfaces?

What if into my karaoke system I build things that range from features with immediate appeal (spotlight tracking, expressivity rating) to those with much more experimental appeal (what about actuators that encourage people to move/gesture in coordinated ways?)

I want to engage in a design research process. - watching karaoke bars - running user tests on low fidelity prototypes - review of literature

Three kinds of projects - Augmenting existing musical instruments - Creating (building) new musical instruments - Reimagining what could be considered a musical instrument (people’s movement through space)

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  • #journal #methodology #possible projects
  • 2 weeks ago
  • 1
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  • 2 weeks ago

Watching Daniel Wurtzel’s work reminds me of the workshop I did several years ago at the EARTH festival in Vancouver with a lighting designer who could create beautiful effects using a sheer fabric and two overhead projectors.

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  • 2 weeks ago
  • 1

artsfortransit:

Yesterday we officially announced Americans for the Arts voted two of Arts for Transit’s 2013 performance art projects as outstanding works for the Public Art Network Year in Review awards. During Grand Central’s centennial party on February 1st, 2013, Charlie Todd (founder of Improv Everywhere) surprised visitors of the terminal by organizing a group of 135 volunteers to perform a choreographed routine in the large windows on the West side of GCT. Please enjoy this beautiful video of Grand Central Lights.

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  • 3 weeks ago
  • 30

Oscilla visualizes the relationship between pure tones as the sum of oscillatory waveforms. “Discordances” in tones show up correspondingly as “messy”-looking waveforms. 

"Oscilla is a site-specific interactive audio-visual installation that explores the oscillatory roots of sound and its visualization. The position and moement of people space (or that of objects a long a surface) generates sinusoidal sounds and controls their amplitude and frequency. The graphic representations of the relationship between frequency, phase, and amplitude of the generated sounds gives life to real-time animated "sound paintings". Participants can thus create morphing chords and harmonies, explore intervals and microtones and discover the connections between sound and image."

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  • #NIME2014 #Previous Work
  • 3 weeks ago
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